Let’s Tune In: Two Journalists Shot Dead with Hunting Ammunition in Brazil

The Javari Valley has become known for illegal fishing, mining, logging, and drug-trafficking activities. The region is known for violent conflicts between these various criminal groups, government agents and indigenous people. These are the specific conflicts that Mr Phillips and Mr Pereira, two journalists who lost their life, were documenting.

Many Critics, a Few Allies, and Some Awkward Friends: Mapping and Explaining Latin American Reactions to Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine

Moscow’s actions in Ukraine were met with widespread condemnation in Latin America. There were, however, a few unsurprisingly friendly words from allied governments and some ambiguous reactions from regional sympathizers.

Kanal Istanbul: A Story of Dangerous and Controversial Megalomania

Since 2011, Erdogan has been pushing for the construction of a new canal to link the Black Sea to the Sea of Marmara. However, this project has been vastly criticized by the public and poses major concerns in a multitude of spheres from the environment to the geopolitical balance of the region.

France’s Anti-Covid Strategy: Compulsory Health Passes, Mandatory Vaccination, and Limitations on Human Rights

France’s anti-Covid strategy is heating the debate around mandatory vaccination. Are Covid-19 vaccine mandates violating human rights? Or are they justifiable and necessary to meet a pressing social need?

Flooding and Fibbing: The Absence of Climate Change Effort from Developed Countries

Following severe flooding across Europe, this article considers the actual efforts of developed countries, particularly in Europe, to substantially address climate change, and asks how much climate responsibility lies at the doorstep of the individual, the government and history.

25 Years After a Conflict: Helping the Youth in Bosnia

Dubioza Kolektiv, a popular Bosnian avant-garde group would say – or rather, sing – that Bosnia-Erzegovina is in Europe “just in Eurosong”. By that, meaning that the country is only welcome as a full-fledged member of Europe when this benefits the image of a multicultural, welcoming continent. But when the lights of Eurovision go off, Bosnia is likely to disappear from the public discourse. If anything, it may come up in conversations simply as the place where “there once was a war”.

In part, this is understandable. How is it possible that a European country could be majority Muslim? Why does it stubbornly refuse to behave like a “normal” democracy? And yet, no matter how divided or unstable, Bosnia is clearly a member of the wobbly, colorful European family.

The Fundamental Right to Strike: 20 Years After Genova, the Fighting Still Ensues

From July 18 to 22, 2001, thousands of people gathered in the narrow streets of Genova. Twenty years later, the legacy of this summit is characterized – rather than from the content of the discussions of the G8 world leaders – from the violence which ensued in the streets, as young protestors and activists which had gathered from all over the world were met with a brutal repression from the Italian police. Hence, it appears that the right to strike, although solidly established and recognised at the international level, is often defied when actually put into practice.

Ukraine’s Latest Near Crisis: Russian Opportunism or a Harbinger of War?

On April 23, 2021, Russia “withdrew” its forces, which it had built up along its border with Ukraine. After a rather rapid escalation and then stagnation of tensions, the question remains: is Russia an opportunist, taking advantage of an “opening” it found, or is this event a real, viable threat to regional stability? Is Russia trying to start an international war or is it merely testing Western waters to see what it can reap without damaging consequences?