One Year of The New Security Law in Hong Kong: An Assessment of the State of Democracy

Two years ago protests broke in Hong Kong against the undemocratic practices of the Chinese regime. One year ago The New Security Law paved the way to a series of attacks to democracy in the city. How has China achieved this? What is its strategy?

Countercultures of Overworking: Socio-Economic Implications of 21st Century Burnout

Young people all over the world are standing in opposition to “traditional” post-industrial expectations placed on them through societal pressure. This article examines two distinct examples of young people expressing their discontent and distinguishes between mere trends and real, formidable movements.

The Palm Oil Havoc in Indonesia

Indonesian forests have been destroyed at a significant rate to create plantations for the palm oil industry. Behind the environmental impacts to forests, rivers, and air, there is a serious human impact, with threats to the life of entire indigenous communities. All this with poor account to the responsible, being companies and government actors.

[ANALYSIS] The Geopolitical Context of Increased Involvement of Great Powers and Middle Powers in Central Asia

Central Asia countries (CAC) are located in a competitive neighbourhood and have had to become adept at realpolitik since the disintegration of the Soviet Union. CAC have been compelled to leverage their respective ties with China to counterbalance Russia as well as develop linkages with the Western power centres to balance against both local hegemons, Russia, and China. This has attracted the attention and interest of Middle Powers as well.

[Analysis] Oil Security in Northeast Asia: Sino-Russian Drillers vs ExxonMobil

Oil and natural gas are undergoing an important crisis, as they are running out worldwide. In this context, powers like Russia and China have chosen to detach from the reliance on Middle Eastern oil, and have been seeking to create their own regional independence to the point companies such as Gazprom and Sinopec have overtaken US and European former leaders like ExxonMobil and Shell. What does this imply for oil security in Northeast Asia? And how are these countries coping with sustainability and oil consumption?